Vacancy & Pricing Request

Fields marked with an * are required

Denver is a city rich in character and history. Since its inception in 1858, there has been an awful lot that has gone on here. The city has changed a lot in the past 150 years, but we don’t forget. We celebrate what has passed and make every effort to honor it with cultural spaces and museums where it can enlighten and inform even today.

Denver makes every effort to preserve our past wherever possible. That can be seen in some of the city’s historical highlights, including:

Denver Union StationDenver (1)

Denver Union Station is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the city. It adorns many walls and photo frames around the city. The old entrance, or “Mizpah,” is a very important icon for the city.

Even years later, the station is a major transport hub for the state.

Dinosaur Ridge

Step back even further into the past, around 100 million years at Dinosaur Ridge. The ridge has dinosaur tracks, bones and a selection of fossils dating back to the earliest days of the dinosaurs.

The Black American West Museum

Moving a little nearer modern times, the Black American West Museum is a venue dedicated to the sacrifices our African-American ancestors made to keep this city whole. Many of the Denver (2)earliest settlers were African-American’s and the museum seeks to enlighten us to their way of life and what they went through to get here.

Bent’s Old Fort

Bent’s Old Fort is a modern reconstruction of a frontier fort and trading post. It is an educational venue with costumed actors on site to give visitors a real flavor of life in the Old West.

Auraria Campus

Auraria Campus is built on the site where the gold rush first began. Now it’s home to some of the State’s best and brightest. The campus hasn’t forgotten its roots though, and now plays host to landmarks such as Ninth Street Historic Park, St. Francis Conference Center, St. Elizabeth’s Church, The Golda Meir House, St. Cajetan’s Center and The Tivoli Tower.

Molly Brown’s House

Molly Brown was a local celebrity long before she survived the Titanic disaster in 1912. Her house on Pennsylvania Street is now preserved as a museum of her long, eventful life.

This is just a taste of what historic Denver has to offer. From Dinosaurs to Titanic survivors and everything in-between. Ours has been a long and illustrious history and we are keen to preserve what we can for future generations.